Helping Homeschooled Kids Find Motivation: How to Create an Inspirational Process

Putting emphasis on how children learn rather than what they learn is one of the keys to ensuring we are helping Homeschooled kids find motivation.

Putting emphasis on how children learn rather than what they learn is one of the keys to ensuring we are helping Homeschooled kids find motivation.

This rule is true both for the standard classroom experience and for homeschooling.

Through an approach based on how children learn, a parent or a homeschool instructor can easily boost motivation and increase the attractiveness of the learning process.

 

Helping Homeschooled Kids Find Motivation

One of the biggest problems with homeschooling is attempting to recreate the classroom setting in a home environment.

This approach obviously doesn’t work because it lacks personalization.

The classroom curriculum is designed for 20 to 30 kids. Homeschooling allows for much more personalization.

Personalization is one of the keys to motivating a homeschooled child and here’s what it takes to keep the learning process inspiring and engaging.

 

Get Children to Take Ownership of Their Homeschooling Process

Active involvement and ownership over the homeschooling process will both help children feel happier about the curriculum.

This approach is equally effective for younger students and for teens.

When homeschooling, you have the freedom to focus on specific subject matters and to make the learning process much more dynamic.

A trip to the grocery store can easily become a learning experience – you don’t need a classroom to make it happen.

You and your child can think about the topics and the activities that will make the most sense.

Whether your kid wants to master essay writing or the sciences, you have the freedom to make these subjects a priority.

Whenever kids feel that their input is being taken in consideration, their involvement in the learning process is going to increase exponentially.

Putting emphasis on how children learn rather than what they learn is one of the keys to ensuring we are helping Homeschooled kids find motivation.

Identify Issues that Stand in the Way of Motivation

Even if you put your child in the driver’s seat, there is still some risk of motivation loss with the passage of time.

When kids become disengaged, chances are that a certain issue is standing in the way of the educational process.

Giving children freedom during the homeschooling process is one thing that many parents and educators struggle with.

They think that a rigid structure is beneficial.

This isn’t always the case.

A child could respond to such an approach with boredom.

A child could also lose interest in studying because of concentration difficulties, a distracting environment, a failure to achieve a certain goal or a belief that a particular subject is way too challenging (so that no amount of effort will ever lead to better understanding).

To be a good homeschooling instructor, you have to pay a lot of attention to details.

Every single response is telling you something about the child’s current perception.

Try tweaking a few things and you will definitely experience a change.

 

Make Learning Fun

Homeschooling can be an incredibly successful process because you have the freedom to make learning fun.

This is one of the best ways to maintain a high engagement level.

Game-based learning is becoming more and more popular because kids today need a bit of interactivity to become invested in learning.

The good news is that you can choose among many entertaining educational activities, apps and games.

Some of those will even be available free of charge.

Incorporating arts, technology, sports and creative expression in education is something that many traditional schools struggle with but something that’s easy to integrate in the homeschooling experience.

The benefits of game-based learning are incredible.

Such interactive options teach kids problem-solving skills, they offer multi-dimensional learning opportunities and they also enable the application of the acquired knowledge in the game itself.

Practical, colorful and interactive, such an approach is certainly great for taking out the boredom of a theoretical classroom session.

Putting emphasis on how children learn rather than what they learn is one of the keys to ensuring we are helping Homeschooled kids find motivation.

Choose the Right Rewards

To build motivation, focus on reward-based experiences rather than threats and punishments.

Negative motivation does not work. Children will be putting the effort in but they will have no motivation.

Rather, students will fear the repercussions. As a result, they will distance themselves from the learning process.

Rewards can achieve much better results. Set small milestones and recognize accomplishments.

Stickers on the page of a successfully completed assignment in a notebook will work for younger kids.

A trip to a favorite leisure spot is ideal for older children.

Make sure that your children have a pretty good idea about what needs to be accomplished and when the reward will be provided.

Use awards sparingly, otherwise they will lose some of the motivating power.

 

Focus on Learning Rather Than Performance

The performance assessments that schools use to check for student progress aren’t always effective motivators.

Many children will lose their desire to learn, especially if they find themselves incapable of excelling in a certain subject.

Focus on the learning process and the progress that has been made.

There is no need to do a math test that’s scored. Make sure that your child can solve a certain problem correctly.

Praise them for the accomplishment and show them just how far along they’ve gotten.

Children can easily recognize progress and it will give them the drive to keep on going.

Putting emphasis on how children learn rather than what they learn is one of the keys to ensuring we are helping Homeschooled kids find motivation.

To sum it up, the secret to homeschooling success is the tailoring of the educational process.

What will work for one child is not necessarily going to deliver good results in another scenario.

Experiment with different approaches and ask for the child’s feedback.

Focus on areas of interest, do some tweaking on the go.

If you’re open to change and to incorporating new experiences in the learning process, you will certainly get the high level of motivation you desire.

BIO

Beverly Lerch is a young freelance writer and a great expert in self-improvement, motivation and productivity. She has many various interests and cannot imagine her life without sport.

 

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